Category Archives: Minnesota United FC

The Loons are alright

Bridget McDowell - Minnesota United FC/mlsfemale
Official Minnesota United FC Reporter

By Bridget McDowell // @BCMcDowell

It could have been the social anxiety or that initial sense of imposter syndrome or merely my habit of observing rather than participating or any combination of the three. But my observational approach to reporting this season taught me more about this fanbase, this club, and this sport, than being in the stands or asking cerebral questions ever would. And it gave me some confidence in the club’s building process.

Minnesota soccer fandom is an obsession for me. Minnesota’s fans have been through it all. From “the team that nobody wanted” in the lower division to the team that everyone doubted in the Major League, they have been singing, chanting, screaming for their boys. The flags, the tifos, the scarves… through two dismal seasons in the MLS, they have not let up.

And they want more to cheer for.

On many occasions, I wanted to ask Adrian Heath: What steps are you taking to be competitive? How long are you going to use the same tactics that get the same crappy results? When does this ‘Three Year Plan’ kick in?

I did not ask any of these questions, or many others, in fact.

Instead, match after match, presser after presser, trade after trade, I’ve watched Heath respond and react to fan criticism and media skepticism; I’ve observed the players interact in the locker room after wins, losses and draws; heard everyone from the front office to the back plead for patience and confidence. I learned that:

  1. Heath does have a plan which may, in fact, be leading somewhere, but which has sputtered along through the process of making fan favorites and potential standout newcomers mesh together on short notice;
  2. the players want to be a cohesive unit and are willing to put in the work, but have limited opportunities to earn one another’s confidence while playing within the lines of the game plan; and
  3. that the club knows full well where the inadequacies lie, where improvements need to be made to earn the confidence of the diehard supporters but have chosen to pave the way to their end goals one small piece at a time.

Yes, I would have like to have sung ‘same as it ever was, same as it ever was’ on more than one occasion, in response to Heath’s standby answer, “We know what we need to get better.” I wanted to ask, WHAT pieces?, every time he said, “We just need one or two more pieces.” But I did not.

Minnesota United FC is attempting to put together a 1,000-piece jigsaw puzzle with all sorts of oddly shaped pieces. The border is complete. Next, they have to fill in the picture, but the package was missing a number of pieces so there are a couple completed sections floating around unanchored.

The fans want a hint at what the completed picture will be. At the end of Year One, Heath pointed to the completed border. “We know what we need to get better.” At the end of Year Two, he pointed to his two Designated Players in the front; the oft-noted trio Molino, Finlay and Cronin; Kallman and captain Calvo in the back – all roster groupings that appear to be semi-permanent portions of the picture, bent and faded as they may be today. “We need to bring in one or two more pieces.”

I have the same sources you do; I don’t know any secrets. I am as frustrated as you are.

However.

I have seen them acknowledge the frying pan. Or, rather, the Iron Skillet. They know that they won’t have a pretty presentation of a shiny, nearly-completed stadium with which to distract the Supporters if that ubiquitous Year Three ends with the same bitter taste as the last two.

This Club is building its MLS identity the same way the squad has earned it’s tastiest goals: A series of clean passes, a couple of long shots and, occasionally, pure dumb luck.

So. Heath out? If we see too many long shots this offseason, maybe I’d board that train. Panic? If we start leaning on dumb luck, yes.

But, hey! We live here now.

And I have a notebook full of questions to ask during the offseason, I promise.

Featured image: mnufc.com

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A momentous, appropriate end to Minnesota’s sophomore season

Bridget McDowell - Minnesota United FC/mlsfemale
Official Minnesota United FC Reporter

By Bridget McDowell // @BCMcDowell

Sunday, October 28: 3-2 Loss

Minnesota United FC‘s sophomore MLS season ended the way anyone who had followed the club this season could have expected. In fact, the 3-2 loss to Columbus Crew is a perfect sample of the season as a whole.

It was momentous. Not in the Merriam-Webster approved sense of the word. It was full of moments. Glimpses of brilliance, glimmerings of hope, pleasant surprises… all things which the Loons present to us with every match. Two of the brightest moments of the finale came from Darwin Quintero and Francisco Calvo.

Quintero’s early run:

Calvo’s first goal:

But it was also full of the same mistakes, the same subpar performances, that have plagued the team week in and week out. Case in point:

The only thing more surprising than defender Francisco Calvo notching two goals in the season finale was that Zardes was allowed to close a slow, regular season with a hat-trick. Except, Minnesota fans can’t actually be surprised anymore.

No, having a lightning delay called just minutes into the match certainly didn’t help things and an extremely slick pitch was not in their favor. But the Loons are no strangers to the proverbial wrench thrown into the game plan, a fact which coach Adrian Heath and the front office like to call attention to in every interview (injuries to key players Kevin Molino, Ethan Finlay and Sam Cronin and questionable VAR calls, for example). By week 33, adjusting to these factors should not be an issue.

When asked about his team’s performance on Sunday night, Heath responded as he has every week, his assessment of this particular match a carbon copy of that of every other loss (and even a few wins) this season:

  • “You do not win many games conceding three [goals] on the road.”
  • “We know what we have to do to get better.”
  • “We need one or two more pieces. If we get them, we have a chance at being more competitive.”

Have we grown or improved in any measurable way on the pitch? Not so much, no.

Are we still just happy to be here? That will depend on what happens in the offseason.

And on how you define happy.

Featured image: @MNUFC

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Minnesota United Frustration Club

Bridget McDowell - Minnesota United FC/mlsfemale
Official Minnesota United FC Reporter

By Bridget McDowell // @BCMcDowell

I do not want to write this. Another loss in front of a lot of fans, another round of #HeathOut chanted instead of ‘Wonderwall,’ another night of bitterness and frustration.

But I do want to write about how real, live Minnesotans do indeed want to watch live soccer, for better or for worse; about how the Supporters could not be silenced, even after Zlatan Ibrahimovic left his mark; about the strides the club must make to erase the bitterness of these past two seasons; and about the fact that despite my frustration, when the fireworks gave way to a different kind of light show, I experienced the goosebumps usually reserved for ‘Wonderwall.’

Last weekend, Minnesota United FC set a new state record for attendance at a professional soccer game. 52,242 fans watched the Loons close out their residency at TCF Bank Stadium making the club’s #50ktoMidway promotion a huge success. The downside, however, was that there were 30,000 more fans present to witness the second consecutive home loss. L.A. Galaxy’s Ibrahimovic argued that they were all there to cheer for him and his squad and by evenings’ end a few United fans probably wished that’s why they had come.

Ibra kicked off what would become a 3-1 rout of the Loons, with a goal in the 30th minute which swung the momentum in Galaxy’s favor after a number of good opportunities for Loons came to naught. Three L.A. goals went unanswered until the 53rd minute when Angelo Rodriguez – who had scored in the first half only to be called offside – finally got his head on a long cross from fellow DP Darwin Quintero and sent it past Bingham into the net.

 But that would be all for the Loons. Adrian Heath spoke positively about Rodriguez’s prospects, but seemed to blame the rest of the squad for his ineffectiveness: “I thought the big man [Rodriguez] led the line really, really well again… We’ve got to start to work out how to use him better and once we do, when we start to play off him, I think there’s a lot of promise in the attacking half.” 

That response is too little, too late for me. He echoed what supporters said of the DP’s first appearances. That was quite some time ago and Rodriguez himself seems to know it. When asked about the fan support that night, he said, “That’s why I tell you that personally, I feel ashamed. We always try to do well during the week to give [the fans] joy on the weekend. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn’t, but truthfully I’m amazed [by their support].”

The squad’s poor performance was overshadowed by the MNUFC digital team’s response to Ibra’s talk in the lead-up about how the ticket sales reflected Minnesota’s love for him rather than support for the Loons. The Bank erupted in cheers and laughter when an error message appeared on the video board in place of Ibra’s head shot as lineups were announced:

The forward nearly had the last laugh though when he sailed a free kick in the 65th minute over the crossbar and into the capo stand, connecting with a Dark Clouds capo.

But, true to form, Nach Karnik and the Dark Clouds turned that moment into a badge of honor:

Bridget McDowell - MNUFC/mlsfemale

Minnesota’s Supporters have learned to find joy in every moment. It’s a necessary coping technique in a season full of bitter losses, questionable decisions and poor performances. If MNUFC wants to fill Allianz Field, they need to do more than talk about improvements and tout the ubiquitous ‘Three Year Plan.’ According to Heath, playing at Allianz “will be nice. I think most people think it’s going to be good. I don’t think they realize how good it’s going to be. This is going to be a game changer for this club moving forward… but we’ve got a lot of work to do before we open up the stadium.”

That’s for sure. Heath and his staff will need to put those words into action, and quickly, to ensure that the emotions evoked by Allianz are matched by the club’s performance.

My anger and high blood pressure quickly dissolved into goosebumps and tears of joy as I watched a live stream on my phone of the Fan Appreciation Night fireworks. The Supporters present at TCF were able to watch a special presentation on the video board while the fireworks burst above them, but my stream showed only the pyrotechnic display, then faded to black. Then another light show began.

https://youtu.be/xNBIx5vAm2o?t=1788

That stadium is ours. Our colors. Our club. Our home. But before we can enjoy our home, our boys must face another team celebrating a triumphant return. If Columbus Crew‘s Decision Day opponent was not MNUFC, I would be cheering for the black and yellow as they celebrate the success of #SaveTheCrew and vie for a playoff berth. But they will play the Loons, a club with no chance at the postseason, but with every opportunity to make a statement.

If the Loons lose, they must do so while gutting it out to the final whistle. Sunday is their last chance to prove to both their supporters and their detractors that they want to be here, that they are worthy of support and of their place in the league.

The Loons must win.

COYL

Featured image: @MLS

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Minnesota, the team to beat

Bridget McDowell - Minnesota United FC/mlsfemale
Official Minnesota United FC Reporter

By Bridget McDowell // @BCMcDowell

How did we get here? To the lowest of the low? The team that makes the worst look good?

From a club that won more than it lost, that entertained its fans no matter the scoreline; that was able to draw moral victories from nearly every loss; that brought the heart and soul of its lineup along to the big leagues. To a club that could only win at home; that saw its fans turn off their TVs and walk out of the stadium; that lost its temper in the ugliest way possible; that jettisoned its heart for some coupons and didn’t give its soul nearly as many opportunities as he deserved.

On September 29, I spent a chilly evening losing my voice in the Supporters Section of TCF Bank Stadium for the last time. Minnesota United FC still had two home games left to play after that night, but that match against NYCFC would be my last of the year to enjoy from the stands and was probably my last time seeing soccer at TCF. After a horrid road trip, United could have flopped that night. But the home turf magic took hold once again and the Loons soared to a 2-0 victory on goals from Angelo Rodriguez. And with stout defense from  Brent Kallman:

Singing Wonderwall with my friends was a great end to my year, but the season was far from over. United still had playoff hopes: a win on the road in Philadelphia could help them eek closer to that bold cutoff line.

They did not win. The Loons I watched on the 29th did not make an appearance in Philly on October 6. And I did something that I never imagined I would do during a MNUFC broadcast.

Twenty minutes into the match, I was still troubleshooting how to connect my tablet to the smart screen in our hotel room so my friend and I could enjoy it on the big screen. We were about to give up when Minnesota conceded a third(!) goal in the 23rd(!) minute. Rather than turn off the TV and watch on the tablet, we muted my livestream and watched an episode of Kitchen Nightmares from 2007 and turned off the tablet altogether with ten minutes to play after Minnesota conceded a fifth goal.

Bridget McDowell - MNUFC/mlsfemale

We chose a 10-year-old reality show over a Loons game and any regrets about that decision evaporated upon opening the post-match press release:

Bridget McDowell - MNUFC/mlsfemale

The Loons’ playoff hopes evaporated along with my regrets. Surely, their return home would be better, especially given the opponent, a Colorado squad on a seven-game losing streak. Neither club with a chance at the postseason, both looking for a moral victory on which to coast through the final weeks of 2018.

Narrator: Nope. No moral victories were had on October 13. But the Loons continued their streak of making bad teams look good.

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to interview MN Kicks defender Alan Merrick about the growth of soccer culture in Minnesota. We talked about the winning tradition of his NASL Kicks and all the signs of growth around Minnesota’s soccer communities:

“We have a great soccer culture. We perhaps need to make it so it’s a little bit more, uh, into a winning mode [laughs], but that takes some time to develop…”

There were plenty of lows in his playing days (the Kicks folded along with many other NASL clubs and attempts at revival were short-lived), but the highs are legendary. Many of the positives we’ve seen from MNUFC are reminiscent of those from the Kicks.

I would like to think that in forty years I will stand outside the offices of a growing Twin Cities-based soccer club with a recorder in hand as I question Miguel Ibarra about his legendary days of playing for MN United FC in the MLS. With any luck, this past Saturday’s bench-clearing melee in the waning minutes against the Rapids will be a distant memory, a fleck of embarrassment overshadowed by the success of the club’s much-touted ‘Three Year Plan,’ a well-developed winning tradition and a backbone of players who came up with the club and shared in its successes before moving on.

Until then, all we have is a bitter loss in which two goals were given up much too easily, so easily that the Dark Clouds became lethargic in their support, a handful even leaving the stadium long before the whistle. Those were the lucky few who didn’t have to witness their favorite player shove an opponent who made the poor decision to taunt the home fans with his goal celebration and the coach’s son to spring up from the bench to grab the throat of another celebrant.

Until this match, our club had had its share of embarrassing moments, but we could make light of most of them, such as this lovely moment that garnered international laughs.

Until we made the joke our own:

But even the NASL Loons’ production department would not be able to salvage the club’s dignity from this moment:

There was no honor in that fight. No moral victories can possibly come from that night.

This weekend, MNUFC will honor the legends with #50ktoMidway, livening up the final match in their adoptive home with an attempt to break an attendance record set forty years ago by the MN Kicks.

I can only hope that forty years from now, when I interview Ibarra, we will not be talking about a club that folded decades ago after failing to maintain a foothold in a league that talked bigger than it acted; a club that was being celebrated for one or two moral victories, but also held as an example of how not to run an expansion club.

Instead, I hope that we will talk about how the Loons honored those legends and 50,000 fans with an epic rendition of Wonderwall; the fight all but forgotten; the club’s clear strides to get better with each match, with each passing season; and the community honoring the key players who saw that struggle through to a title.

I would like to leave you with a response to that fight in the tradition of #BlameItOntheJelly, but I’ve already said that such a thing will never exist.

All I have to offer you is this cover of ‘Wonderwall.’

I’m not crying. You’re crying.

Featured image: @MNUFC

Follow and chat with me on Twitter // @BCMcDowell

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The Future of Minnesota Soccer

Bridget McDowell - Minnesota United FC/mlsfemale
Official Minnesota United FC Reporter

By Bridget McDowell // @BCMcDowell

On Tuesday, August 21, just 30 minutes after Minnesota United FC sent out a press release announcing the addition of Fernando Bob, another message appeared in my soccer-heavy inbox.

The subject line: ‘ANNOUNCING a huge step forward for the club’

It was sent out to members of Minneapolis City SC, a Minnesota club which competes in the National Premier Soccer League, but the announcement had nothing to do with flashy player signings (City’s roster is built entirely of Minnesota natives, most of whom play while home on break from the NCAA) or a new stadium or menswear sponsorship. No, it was more tangible than all that.

Minneapolis City SC was opening a storefront, The Club Shop, a retail space to be shared with their kit designer, Stimulus Athletic (founded by former MNUFC striker Geison Moura), and a gathering space for club staff, players and members.

To be honest, this email was a tad more exciting for some of us in the Minnesota soccer scene than Bob’s signing. This lower league club, in only its third season (second in NPSL), has a large following, in part because of its winning ways (the Crows were undefeated through the 2018 regular season) and because of its member-driven business model (members vote for everything from board members to kit design). Basically, a refreshing antithesis to MLS club currently playing just across the Mississippi River.

So how did the idea of a retail space come about?

“The idea was brought up in a pipe-dream sort of way with no real expectation of it ever happening,” said business director Sarah Schreier. “And then, you know how sometimes you might look at available homes or apartments without the intention of ever moving, but then you find this amazing space?  It was like that. It happened very quickly and almost impulsively — but we had to pull the trigger on it or we’d lose it.  We thought we’d give it a go and see what came of it.”

The Club Shop opened on Saturday, September 22 with a day-long event, starting with a Premier League watch party (Liverpool was heavily favored by the standing room only crowd) and appearances by Minnesota soccer legends. Yes, Minnesota has soccer legends. This is the part where I remind you all that despite its sophomore status in Major League Soccer, this fair state had a foot in the soccer door long before this league existed.

Minnesota first hosted a soccer team in 1976, when the Denver Dynamo moved to the Twin Cities and became the Minnesota Kicks. The Kicks competed in the National American Soccer League (the first version) and played in Met Stadium in Bloomington, a space they shared with the Minnesota Twins baseball team.

The first Kicks home game, on Mother’s Day in 1976, had to be delayed multiple times while staff attempted to usher in a crowd significantly larger than the 8,000 expected. After every gate was thrown open, at least 20,000 people watched the Kicks earn their first win of the season.

“We were fortunate that when we came into the state in ‘76 there was no soccer here at all […] so we had to build something from scratch and we only had a short period of time to do it,” explained defenseman Alan Merrick. “So I think that the players that you described – Alan Willey, Steve Litt, myself, Jeff Barnett – we were pioneers of the game here and we built a culture very very quickly and the culture was to win. And it was that simple. We were forthright in everything that we did; we were honest, we were a lot full of endeavor. And we realized that we were, you know, right from square one, going to make things happen.”

Even after the Kicks folded in 1981, the enthusiasm remained. Unfortunately, Minnesota soccer repeatedly fell victim to the financial woes which continue to pepper the American soccer landscape today. After the Kicks came the Strikers (Major Indoor Soccer League, 1984-88), then the Thunder (United Soccer League, 1995-09), the NSC Minnesota Stars (owned by the National Sports Center Foundation and playing in Division 2, 2010) and the Minnesota Stars (under NASL ownership, 2011).

The latest era began when Dr. Bill McGuire purchased the Stars and rebranded the club as Minnesota United FC in time for the 2012 NASL season.

Continued success is dependant on people fostering a love of the game at every level and tapping into the roots that shape Minnesota soccer today.

“From that first game, the crowds just kept building and building and the soccer intelligence of the fans developed and developed… And we just kept on building and building and building,” Merrick said. “And to this day, I mean, it’s still building: the high school programs are brilliant in terms of participation.”

With the success of the women’s program at the U of M, the Minnesota Thunder Academy which sends many players to Division I schools, and the impressive results of Minneapolis City SC (from which some players have leaped to the pros, like Brandon Bye of the New England Revolution) the next generation of Minnesota legends are carrying the torch.

“We know that Minnesota players are being produced and produced in good numbers. So I mean it’s indicative now, seeing a store like this, in Minneapolis. It’s a storefront that’s going to have people…” Merrick paused, then pointed to a chalkboard displayed on the sidewalk at The Club Shop’s front door. “Look on the board there: ‘Soccer’ AND ‘culture.’ We have a great soccer culture.”

“We [Minneapolis City] are, in our own way, a throwback to the way things used to be,” Schreier said. “At the same time, we’re building on that and growing the landscape and culture the best we know how.  The soccer landscape is full of ups and downs — now we’re on an up and we want to celebrate that without forgetting an incredible, community-oriented past.”

And so, amidst limited edition Minneapolis City SC merch, throwback Kicks t-shirts and assorted Minnesota soccer memorabilia, people crowded into a South Minneapolis storefront to chat with City staff, watch some soccer and share stories from the past with Merrick, Willey and Steve Litt (Kicks), Minnesotan and Soccer Bowl Champion Joe Warren (Stars) and star forward Pablo Campos (NASL-era MNUFC).

This intermingling of fans, players and staff was a common sight when United played in Blaine and it was a key attraction for many fans. While the move to MLS has detracted from that cultural experience with United, Minneapolis City is enriching it. And these two very different clubs are both important to the future of soccer in Minnesota.

“It makes for a richer community,” explained Schreier. “We use the coffee analogy a lot:  it’s good to have Starbucks and the local offbeat place if you want a thriving soccer scene and both learn from and play off of each other to get better.  We think we can have that complementary relationship with MLS which makes soccer in Minnesota richer, more varied, and more interesting for having us both here,” Schreier explained.

“We’re not here to try and recreate the wheel.   We didn’t create the soccer culture here in MN — it was here before many of us were born — we just want it back! Soccer culture here is not lost.”

And if The Club Shop’s grand opening is any indication, soccer culture is here to stay.

For more information about Minneapolis City SC, check out www.mplscitysc.com and follow them on Twitter @mplscitysc.

Featured image: Bridget McDowell

Follow and chat with me on Twitter // @BCMcDowell

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Just maybe, Loons fans. Just maybe.

Bridget McDowell - Minnesota United FC/mlsfemale
Official Minnesota United FC Reporter

By Bridget McDowell // @BCMcDowell

Saturday, September 22: 3-2 Win

A scrappy squad came home to roost at the University of Minnesota on Saturday night. Was it pretty? Not always. Was it effective? In the first half, yes; in the second, just barely. Was it enough to win? Probably not enough for a spot in the playoffs, but it resulted in a round of Wonderwall for the fans who might just give the front office a few days’ peace and quiet. Three points all around then.

Minnesota United FC, a club that typically has problems getting out of its own half — with every attack muddled in the midfield and defensive tactics picked apart with a few probing passes — quickly found its legs against a tough Portland Timbers side. Of course, the Loons, who began the match attacking toward the Supporters, had this strong image to bolster their intentions against the Timbers:

United, running out a 4-2-3-1 which consisted of 6 midfielders, cast an unlikely Paul Bunyan: Romario Ibarra. When Darwin Quintero took advantage of a beautiful long ball from midfield to charge into the box, Portland keeper Steve Clark dove too early; Quintero skipped the ball over him toward the far post and into the path of Romario Ibarra. Step, shoot, score. 1-0 in the 18th minute.

It took ‘Super Romario’ another 18 minutes to bag a brace, putting the home team up 2-0, but the moment was soured by a leg injury during the play that saw him subbed off immediately. No matter. Minnesota had another lumberjack in back.

Defender Michael Boxall scored a stunner to widen the gap minutes before the break and it was as if some sort of alternate reality had developed at TCF Bank Stadium.

Thankfully, Alvas Powell and Sebastien Blanco came out of the Portland dressing room determined to remind us that we are Minnesota sports fans. With Powell and Blanco scoring in the 55th and 79th minutes, respectively, the Supporters, though loud, became unsettled. The questions began: Would the Supporters sing Wonderwall with raised scarves or would they hum another tune over their sad beers?

Hello Darkness, my old friend. I’ve come to talk with you again…

A red card issued to Fernando Bob in the final minute of regulation would have been the cue for Simon & Garfunkel for most teams. But the Loons play better a man down than up. They gutted out six minutes of stoppage time. And that beautiful record played.

And all the roads we have to walk are winding…

Unlike a previous 3-2 win at home, the locker room was festive and Adrian Heath spoke encouragingly (and cryptically, as always), pointing to positive moments from his players (Miguel Ibarra‘s work rate, Quintero’s creativity) that they can build on this week.

And build they must against NYCFC. Bob and Maximiano will be suspended and Romario Ibarra is yet to be assessed. But in this stadium, with these fans, with just a little momentum…

Just maybe…

Featured image: @MNUFC

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Loons fly fast when they’re headed home

Bridget McDowell - Minnesota United FC/mlsfemale
Official Minnesota United FC Reporter

By Bridget McDowell // @BCMcDowell

Saturday, September 15: 1-1 Draw

Wednesday, September 12: 2-1 Loss

Minnesota United FC returns home this week after a five-game stretch on the road and, boy, do they need to be home. The final match, at Real Salt Lake on Saturday, doubled the number of points the Loons packed for the trip home: Two.

But let’s shelve RSL for a minute. On Wednesday night, MNUFC visited Audi Field for the first time and played everyone’s least favorite United club in front of a hurricane crowd, or rather, a few DC locals and a large contingent of Dark Clouds. Unfortunately, Minnesota’s performance was nothing to blow them away.

Despite DP Angelo Rodriguez putting the Loons up one-nil in the 47th minute, his first (and long overdue) MLS goal…

…DC would later level the score, then gain the lead, in just under four minutes.

Further souring the loss was the early exit of Jerome Thiesson. The defender collided with a teammate just minutes into his return from a lingering injury and left the match with a (to-date) undisclosed ankle injury. While his teammates boarded a plane to Utah, Thiesson flew home.

Things were slightly better a thousand feet above sea level, once you got past an incoherent lineup, (yet another) injury to striker Abu Danladi, (yet another) early conceded goal and the usual confusion over Adrian Heath’s substitution tactics (Danladi was the only Loon to exit). Though now that I think of it, we may never get past all that. Anyway.

In the second half, Miguel ‘Batman’ Ibarra celebrated Batman Day right, with two late goals that leveled, then elevated, the Loons. But we are not allowed to escape the Darkness and this beauty was disallowed after an eternal VAR review erased it from the scoreboard. Darwin Quintero was just a hair offside when he served the ball:

Thiesson speaks for us all:

MN United FC returns to the U of M on Saturday, September 22, to face the Portland Timbers on friendly turf. The Supporters have stepped up their tifo game this week so one can only hope the players and coaching staff will step up their game as well. Playoffs may be out of the picture, but the Loons still have an opportunity to renew the faith of diehard fans before closing out Soft Open 2.0.

Featured image: @MNUFC

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‘That’s the way it is’ for MNUFC

Bridget McDowell - Minnesota United FC/mlsfemale
Official Minnesota United FC Reporter

By Bridget McDowell // @BCMcDowell

Saturday, August 25: 2-0 Loss

The latest edition of the ‘Nicest Rivalry’ ended the way it always does. Minnesota United FC dropped three points in Kansas City, losing 2-0 and stretching their road record to 1-11-1. The match was not quite as disappointing as previous meetings – the Loons had good opportunities and toughed out the full 90 minutes, managing to hold Sporting goalless through the first half – but the commentary from the gaffer is considerably more frustrating.

Forced to play without midfielder and leading goal scorer Darwin Quintero, the 3-5-2 returned with new DP Angelo Rodriguez and rookie Mason Toye (recalled from his USL loan) spearheading the attack. The result was much what you would expect from two players with twenty appearances and one assist between them – plenty of opportunities, but no results. It’s not that we expected them to be a like-for-like replacement of Quintero who has ten goals and nine assists in nineteen appearances, but had the match been played at home, I can guarantee the Wonderwall’s ‘Score, da*n it!” call would have been heavily used, with considerably more harshness than humor.

Of course, if this match had been played at home, the Loons may have won. When sideline reporter Jamie Watson asked Adrian Heath for his first reaction to the loss, the gaffer replied, “That’s the way it is on the road.”

Frustrated yet? Wait, there’s more.

From the post-match press release: “Some of the [offensive] performances were quite good, but it’s another disappointing defeat on the road which [sic] I feel as though I’m saying the same things a lot of the time.” And, “It’s the oldest saying in football: goals change games. They scored at really important times and that was the disappointment because I don’t think they had to work hard enough for their two goals.”

With such comments coming week after week, here is what the Supporters have started to hear: Losing on the road is simply common practice for the Loons. An expected hazard. The early-season win in Orlando was a fluke – Did you really expect another? We were good, but disappointing; poor, but promising. Goals go both ways. Moments of greatness mean nothing if you can’t score, but goals are more important than moments.

Centerback and Man of the Match Brent Kallman (“He’s one of us!”) offered a more reasonable perspective on the match:

“When you think about the games we’ve played here, you can use the word embarrassing. The performances have been. But we can hold our heads high after this one.[…] We were more disciplined. We stayed more to the plan. We can take that moving forward because things don’t really get any easier. We’ve got a lot of road games still.”

Fortunately, the Loons have two weeks to plan their tactics for the next match against DC United and to decide what angle the remainder of their road narrative will take. And with a handful of crucial starters out of the discussion (Michael Boxall is suspended for yellow card accumulation, Francisco Calvo is suspended as well as receiving a call-up from Costa Rica for a stretch of friendlies,  Rasmus Schuller was called up by Finland, Eric Miller and Darwin Quintero are questionable with injuries, and Tyrone Mears has mutually separated from the club) the Loons will need to make every minute of that extended rest and training count. 

If not for them, for their Supporters.

Featured image: Scarfage

Follow and chat with me on Twitter // @BCMcDowell

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Loons camp out in Dallas, come home empty handed

Bridget McDowell - Minnesota United FC/mlsfemale
Official Minnesota United FC Reporter

By Bridget McDowell // @BCMcDowell

Saturday, August 18: 0-2 Loss

The Loons flew south this past weekend to face first-place FC Dallas. They were probably eager to get the match over with, to take any points they possibly could against the western conference leaders and move on with their road trip. In so many ways, it was a disappointing night.

A handful of players needed to make an impression in this match for a chance to earn more appearances in the lineup once the starters they replaced that night returned. With defenders Francisco Calvo and Collen Warner on suspension, and forward Darwin Quintero on the injury list, MNUFC rolled out a unique 4-3-3 with Franz Pangop getting his first start alongside Angelo Rodriguez and Collin Martin. Romario Ibarra – who scored last week – and Heath Harrison – who has been struggling for minutes – were the bench.

Intriguing. But we had to wait a while to see how that would work out. Set for a 7 PM kickoff, rain and lightning caused a weather delay which stretched on for more than two hours.

Twitter was entertaining in the interim…

After following along with the waiting game on Twitter for two and a half hours, I waited just long enough to see that the game would happen. Once kickoff was confirmed for 9:40, I went to bed. And I am glad I did.

I opened Twitter right away on Sunday morning with the hope that the first dozen tweets in my feed wouldn’t involve lyrics from Simon and Garfunkel’s ‘Sound of Silence.’ Here’s just a small sample of what awaited me:

Minnesota lost 2-0, after conceding one goal in each half. So the defense wasn’t great (though Brent Kallman did earn Man of the Match) and neither was the attack.

I pulled up the club’s recap and press release to see what Adrian Heath had to say, always the most intriguing part of the post-match experience. I puzzled over this statement all day:

“The unfortunate thing at this moment in time,” said Heath, “we had no Calvo, we had no Quintero, no Molino, no Ethan Finlay, no Sam Cronin. We aren’t strong enough and deep enough to cope with five of our best players not being on the field and that’s the harsh reality. It’s another reminder that we have to get better. We’re not where we need to be or where we want to be at this moment.”

The absences of Calvo and Quintero are notable. However, citing the absences of the other three players is a bit strange. The Loons have been without Kevin Molino since his ACL tear on March 10, without Ethan Finlay since April 22 (also ACL) and without Sam Cronin for over one year as he deals with neck and concussion issues.

United has had two opportunities to bring in suitable replacements for Molino and Finlay and, considering the club’s passion for signing depth at midfield (winger, winger, winger), it is strange that the absence of those two mids would be cited as an obstacle to overcome now, more than four months later. The Loons have managed to string together some wins since those season-ending injuries, so that is no excuse for whatever happened on Saturday night.

(No, I still have not watched the match.)

How MNUFC utilizes newcomer Fernando Bob in the no. six spot will be a good barometer of how the club plans to move forward. The success (or lack thereof) of attacker Angelo Rodriguez and defender Fernando Bob could set the tone for how the club moves forward in both the remainder of the season and in terms of the ‘three-year plan.’ If that plan involves shifting into another 4-3-3 around these two…

Well, let’s not go there just yet. I have not yet found a cover of ‘Sound of Silence’ with a suitably depressing tone.

Featured image: @MNUFC

Follow and chat with me on Twitter // @BCMcDowell

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MNUFC: Northern (High)Lights

Bridget McDowell - Minnesota United FC/mlsfemale
Official Minnesota United FC Reporter

By Bridget McDowell // @BCMcDowell

It has been a busy week in the North. Since I failed to keep up on sharing the news, even via Twitter, here is my witty attempt to catch us all up before the Loons face FC Dallas. The Northern (High) Lights:

A fan favorite returns

Swiss defender Jerome (Jerry, to the fans) Thiesson has finally returned to full duty after a two-month hiatus. Jerry last played on May 20, a home match against Sporting Kansas City, before being sidelined by a nagging calf injury. A few comeback attempts were thwarted by setbacks, but Jerry was seen training with the rest of the starters this week and was not included on the Out or Questionable lists released ahead of the squad’s flight to Dallas. His return is timely, given Francisco Calvo’s red card suspension.

A fan favorite flies high again

Christian Ramirez, traded last week to expansion club LAFC, made his first start (second appearance) for the club on Wednesday night against Real Salt Lake. With all of Minnesota watching (and a few LAFC fans), the forward scored two vintage-Christian goals to lead his new club to victory, 2-0, and earned himself Man of the Match. RSL keeper, Nick Rimando was pulled from the game at the break, and there is some debate amongst United fans whether the cause was more likely to be an injured hamstring or injured pride (he conceded two to Christian at TCF Stadium just a few weeks ago). My money is on a combination of the two.

Moving on out

Bertrand Owundi Eko’o was sent on loan to USL side Charlotte Independence, this week. Though the deal includes a recall option, it is unlikely that MNUFC will exercise that option on this defender, given that the only action Eko’o has seen since the start of the MLS regular season was the July friendly against Saprissa of Costa Rica. The Cameroonian international was a high-profile signing during the Loons’ preseason, but he is expected to close out his season in Charlotte.

Moving on in?

MNUFC revealed early this week that an international trialist was participating in closed-door practice through the week, but declined to reveal his name or even his nationality. Media present at open sessions did discover that the unnamed trialist spoke Portuguese. Rumors ran rampant until The Athletic MN reported, on Tuesday night, that the mystery man was Brazilian Fernando Bob.

Supporters rejoiced over Bob’s position and his name. Not only are the Loons sorely lacking in the position of defensive midfielder, but Bob gives fans another opportunity at utilizing an Abba song (‘Can You Hear the Drums, Fernando?’ was being tested out until Luiz Fernando Ferreira Maximiano chose to play as, simply, Maximiano) in addition to a plethora of Bob-centric themes (one front runner is ‘Bob the Builder,’ a fact I share with you so that the tune may infest your nighttime thoughts as it has mine).

You are very welcome.

Ninth place Loons, sans Calvo and Collen Warner, square off against the first place Burn, er, FC Dallas, Saturday night at 7 p.m. CST. 

Featured image: @MNUFC

Follow and chat with me on Twitter // @BCMcDowell

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